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4 tips for getting everyone on the dance floor

4 tips for getting everyone on the dance floor

Something which worries every bride and groom is that niggling fear that no one will have fun at your wedding. What if everyone hates the food? What if a storm prevents anyone from coming? What if no one dances!!!? Well we can’t do anything about the food or weather, but when it comes to entertainment we know our stuff. Keep reading for our top tips on getting your guests on the dance floor

Obviously, a top notch, professional party band or wedding DJ is the biggest advantage in ensuring your reception is a success. Our books are full to the brim with an enormous variety of bands and acts guaranteed to get your party started, but there are lots of additional things you can do to encourage people to boogie on down. 

1) Think about your dance floor carefully; most people don’t want to be the centre of attention when strutting their stuff. A good way to avoid this is by sandwiching the dance floor in between your band or DJ and the remaining tables. This moves the focus from the dancing to the professional act up front. 

2) Think carefully about the kind of lighting you are using. Bright overhead lights can often be rather stark and in the cold light of day guests are far less likely to let loose and bust some grooves. Instead keep overhead lights off and opt for up lighting or a twinkling dance floor

3) Make sure the bar is fully stocked and flowing. Dancing is thirsty work, so on top of a plethora of alcoholic beverages (which will no doubt help encourage the dad dancing), make sure your bar has a good selection of soft drinks to ensure your guests don’t overheat whilst putting their best foot forward. 

4) Any of our Toast party bands or DJs know that the key to getting people off their chairs and on to the dance floor is choice of tunes. Picking songs which will appeal to all ages is a fine art. Get it wrong and tumbleweed will appear where dancing feet should be. Some general rules are: keep the tempo up, play songs people know, don’t try and be too fashionable – the oldies are often the best and finally be willing to change it all up if it isn’t working. 


Posted 19 September 2016 by Rachel Soothill

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